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We don’t recommend any supplements beyond fish oils and a multi for clients. Why? Don’t I believe that there are some benefit to certain supplement products? Maybe, but I’m not willing to get on that slippery slope. Supplements are not heavily regulated by the FDA so the marketing and ingredients can be misleading. As such, once you start recommending supplements to clients, you are opening a huge can of worms in my opinion. I believe you can get 99% of what you need from whole foods and that you only need to supplement in special cases.

A great example of a real food that can benefit your health and your workouts is coffee. First, nothing beats a good ole cup of Joe to start your day right. Next, there is a ton of research to support that coffee is good for your well being as well as your performance.

According to WebMD:

“Coffee, the much maligned but undoubtedly beloved beverage, just made headlines for possibly cutting the risk of the latest disease epidemic, type 2 diabetes. And the real news seems to be that the more you drink, the better.”

 

At least six studies indicate that people who drink coffee on a regular basis are up to 80% less likely to develop Parkinson’s, with three showing the more they drink, the lower the risk. Other research shows that compared to not drinking coffee, at least two cups daily can translate to a 25% reduced risk of colon cancer, an 80% drop in liver cirrhosis risk, and nearly half the risk of gallstones.

 

There’s also some evidence that coffee may help manage asthma and even control attacks when medication is unavailable, stop a headache, boost mood, and even prevent cavities.

What about the performance benefits?

“What caffeine likely does is stimulate the brain and nervous system to do things differently,” he tells WebMD. “That may include signaling you to ignore fatigue or recruit extra units of muscle for intense athletic performance. Caffeine may even have a direct effect on muscles themselves, causing them to produce a stronger contraction. But what’s amazing about it is that unlike some performance-enhancing manipulation some athletes do that are specific for strength or sprinting or endurance, studies show that caffeine positively enhances all of these things.”

 

The bottom line: “People who already drink a lot of coffee don’t have to feel ‘guilty’ as long as coffee does not affect their daily life,” says Hu. “They may actually benefit from coffee habits in the long run.”

That’s what I like to hear- no guilt with my coffee!

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Rick Mayo